Travelling by car in Holland


Travelling by car in Holland

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Discover Holland by car and enjoy the most beautiful routes through Holland and the excellent roads and facilities. We have collected some practical tips for you …

  • Explore Holland by car and enjoy the excellent roads.
  • The historic cities of Delft and Leiden are just an hour’s drive from Amsterdam.
  • Read the tips and regulations for driving in Holland.
  • What to do when your car breaks down.

Excellent road network

There are many ways to travel in Holland, but by car is definitely among the best! Holland is not just a small country, which makes for relatively short distances, but the road network is extensive and well-maintained as well. The road signs are very clear, which makes driving a car in Holland very safe. Another advantage is that Holland has just two toll roads: the Western Scheldt Tunnel and Dordtse Kil. 

Easy distances

Holland is not a big country, so driving to and from different cities and locations is easily done. Cities like Utrecht, Rotterdam, The Hague, Delft and Leiden are just an hour’s drive from Amsterdam. And the trip from Amsterdam to Maastricht just takes two hours and 15 minutes. In short, Holland is a wonderfully compact country to explore by car!


Whether you need petrol, diesel or natural gas, gas stations can be found everywhere in Holland. In addition to fuel, they also often offer food, drinks, magazines and small groceries. Tip: Buy your fuel in a city or village if possible, since it is often a little more expensive along the motorway. For reasons of safety, natural gas is available primarily from gas stations outside city limits. 

Maximum speed 

The maximum speed on motorways varies from 100 to 130 kilometres per hour. Trunk roads have a maximum speed of 80 kilometres per hour while the top speed in cities and villages is 50 or 30 kilometres per hour. Several motorways feature a speed control system that measures your average speed over a longer stretch of road, so make sure to keep an eye on that speedometer!

Regulations and violations

In a small and densely populated nation like Holland, traffic safety is very important. The roads are lined with speed camera detectors and the police monitor roads on a regular basis as well. Don’t exceed the top speed, only make hands-free calls when driving, and don’t drive after you have enjoyed alcoholic beverages. If you do, the fine may cost you several hundreds of euros!

Next to speed violations, a number of other things are important when driving in Holland. You must always wear a seatbelt, both in front and behind. Children smaller than 1.35 metres (below 18) must be transported in a child seat. And of course, driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs is strictly prohibited!

What to bring when travelling by car

If you plan to use your own car or a rental car, always make sure to carry an emergency triangle and safety vest. Using these are mandatory when your car breaks down on the road. Other useful things to take are a set of spare lights, a first aid kit, a life hammer, warm blankets, a pocket light and an emergency charging cable for your cell phone. And always make sure to bring sufficient food and drinks with you!

Car trouble

If your car breaks down on the road, first take yourself, your passengers and if possible your car to a safe location. You can then contact the Wegenwacht (road service) via roadside emergency telephones or call +31(0)88 2692 888. In emergencies, call the 112 emergency number immediately. Always wait for assistance behind the crash barrier and never leave anyone in the car on the road or shoulder! And finally, never cross the motorway as this is extremely dangerous!

Parking in Holland

Most cities in Holland have introduced paid parking. You can park your car in the indicated spaces or a covered car park. The available payment methods are generally debit card, credit card and cash.

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