Dutch cheese shops

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Cheese is important in Holland, and no less so in Amsterdam. The economy of the country and the city revolves around their main consumer exports like flowers, cheese, and beer. But Holland isn't homogeneous. Each area of the country has a different flavor and a different atmosphere. Cheese is the perfect example of this. The cheese export industry in Holland is worth 7 billion euros yearly.  And the variety of cheeses produced is immense.

Best cheese shops in Amsterdam

When traveling in Amsterdam you have the opportunity to visit multiple cheese shops, and taste the flavors of many different regions of Holland. There are many very good cheese shops in the city, and you can find them in every neighborhood.

  • Wander over to the Oud Zuid neighborhood on Stadionweg to L'Amuse and compare Dutch cheese to the rest of the world. With over 400 varieties, this shop keeps their cheese stock in climate-controlled facilities according to each one's specific needs.
  • De Kaaskamer in the Jordaan shopping area on Runstraat.
  • Kaashuis Tromp on Utrechtsestraat or Elandsgracht, which collects Dutch cheese in all variations along with fresh baked breads and a number of wines.
  • The most renowned perhaps is the Reypenaer Shop and Tasting Room (on Singel). Reypenaer is a small cheese company that runs its own shop and offers classes in cheese and cheese tasting in its basement area. It is well-known to the tourist industry, and many package tours will include a stop here. 
  • Kaashandel Kef (on Marnixstraat) carries great French flavors as well as Dutch.

A taste of Holland

If you are exploring on your own, you have even more opportunities. You can cheese-make yourself a "cheese tour" by bicycle, renting a bike, and going from neighborhood shop to neighborhood shop trying out the sheer variety of cheeses. Or if you are a little more adventurous, take a train to one of the villages or towns outside the city and do a farm tour. Exploring Amsterdam and its surrounds should always include a break for cheese and coffee (or beer).

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